Summer allergy avoidance tips

Summer Allergy Travel Tips

School is out, summer is in full swing, and it is prime time for summer vacations and traveling. Summer travel with environmental allergies, asthma, or food allergies may make planning a vacation seem like a daunting task. Not to worry! We can show how to keep summer allergy issues at bay during your staycation, beach trip or wine tour of your dreams.

Summer can be an ideal time to travel. The hot summer months can actually provide relief to some, like those with tree pollen allergies. Unfortunately for others, summer comes with its own allergy triggers. While tree pollen counts tend to be lower, the summer heat pushes grass and mold pollen to be higher. Ragweed begins to appear in the late summer and early fall months to kick off fall allergies. Pollen is not the only trigger you can expect; more stinging insects and hotter temperatures in summer months can complicate matters for asthma sufferers.

Summer Allergy Location Tips

 

Summer allergy travel tips
Tips for summer allergy travel. Paspalum seed heads, filled with seeds, surrounded by grasses and other weeds.

Location is everything! One consideration is that pollen counts tend to be lower on the coast, so beaches may be a good option. The desert, or alternatively snowy mountain tops, can also be ideal for pollen, although maybe not for summer travel. Does your vacation involve hiking or mountain climbing? Dust mites do not prefer elevations above 2,500 feet, so that may be a great choice as well. Wherever you decide to go check the allergen forecasts for that area. You should also check current pollen counts each day there. If high pollen counts are in the forecast, consider planning inside activities during your trip.

Checking pollen counts may not be the only forecast to make sure to monitor. As the temperatures rise, you can expect the humidity to rise as well. Many who suffer from asthma can find their condition aggravated by the high temperatures and humid climate. When planning your time outside during the summer, check the air quality for low humidity and low ozone days. You can also avoid triggers by planning around the heat of the day when possible.

Packing for Vacation

Although your favorite swimsuit may be more fun, allergy control measures should equally be at the highest priority. Staying compliant to your recommended treatment protocol in the days before you leave is crucial. These measures will support well-maintained symptoms while traveling, and for the duration of the trip.

  • Make sure to pack allergy medication and immunotherapy in a carry-on bag if traveling by plane.
    • Try to keep medications in original packaging and pack all medication and allergen immunotherapy in a separate, clear bag.
    • Any liquid or gel medications or immunotherapy will need to individually be 3-4 ounces or smaller. Consider purchasing travel sizes if standard sizes do not meet this requirement.
  • Pack 1-2 days of additional medication or immunotherapy than what will be needed in case of delay when traveling.
  • It may be beneficial to set a reoccurring alarm on a phone before leaving. Normal routines may change with travel and vacation plans.
  • Finally, are you traveling out of the country? If you are traveling to a non-English speaking location, bring a list of your allergies in the native language. You may also learn to say or write  “I’m allergic to _____.” in the local language.

Additionally, do not forget to pack any hypoallergenic hygiene products that you regularly use. Examples might be sunscreen, after sun cream, lotions, ointments, body wash, or laundry detergent. When searching for accommodations, remember that more and more hotels offer items like mattress and pillow covers or hypoallergenic linens so you may not have to pack your own. It may also be helpful to ask about smoke free rooms, away from humid, mold friendly pool areas if possible. If pet dander is a concern, take note of whether the location is “pet friendly”.

Summer Allergy Avoidance Tips

Air in enclosed spaces such as planes and trains can sometimes be extremely dry.  Consider investing in nasal saline spray or washes, as well as portable humidifier. A humidifier will likely also be beneficial if staying in a hotel for more than a night or two. Staying well hydrated with water and non-caffeinated beverages will also greatly help you combat drying out. If traveling by car, considering utilizing the heat or air conditioning and keeping windows closed. Also, turning on the heat or air 10 minutes before departure can help clear vents of any residual allergen particles.

While enjoying your destination, remember that peak pollen times are typically early in the day (specifically 5am 10am). Scheduling desired outdoor activities for later in the day or just before dusk may help to reduce exposures. Similarly to when you are home, a daily shower is helpful for allergen avoidance. Showering before bed will help to wash away allergens that have adhered themselves to your skin or hair. This is especially important to maintain so that your pillow, sheets, and the immediate space you breathe in all night is allergen free.

Insect Allergies

Another aspect of the summer allergy concerns may be insects. If stinging insect allergies are present planning ahead can alleviate a lot of anxiety and allow for a smooth trip. Always make sure to carry a minimum of two epinephrine auto injectors if it has been prescribed to you or a loved one. Make sure the epinephrine autoinjector is carried in a way it can be accessed and administered within 60 seconds of a need arising.

If you or a loved one does have life threatening allergies, it is a good idea to check with your health insurance and ensure you know where to seek medical care should the need arise while you are out of town. You may also consider carrying an allergy identification card. It can be helpful to keep a card in your wallet listing your allergies, and also emergency contact information and your healthcare provider information. This can be especially important for children who may be summer camps or staying overnight with friends or family.

Food Allergies

If food allergies are present, packing your own meals or snacks may make traveling easier. Preparing food yourself is always the safest option. Alternatively, research the local dining hot spots you wish to visit in advance of leaving for your trip. This allows you to identify safe selections from the menu or you can call to request proper menu accommodations. You may still consider packing your own snacks if you have food allergies. While it may be possible to plan meals around food allergies, snacks often present more of a challenge. Pack allergy friendly snacks, especially if lengthy plane rides are involved.

 

Amanda Hofmann, MPAS, PA-C, is a graduate of Duquesne University, in Pittsburgh, PA. After spending 8 years in clinical practice, she joined United Allergy Services where she is currently the Vice President of Clinical. Amanda is also the past president of the Association of PAs in Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. 

United Allergy Services is also on FacebookLinkedInor TwitterSee other interesting and related articles on the UAS Blog.


Grass Pollen Allergy: Making the Most of Summer

Summer is finally here! Longer days, days spent by the beach or the pool, and late nights catching fireflies are on the horizon. Allergies are usually associated with the spring or fall because pollen is most active during these times. However, summer allergies, especially to grass, are also common. This grass pollen allergy can cause some of the same troublesome symptoms as in other seasons.

Allergy Season

Grass begins to pollinate in the late spring, typically April or May in the northern part of the country. The pollination period in the north will then typically continue through June or July. However, in southern regions, grasses may pollinate throughout many seasons and could trigger symptoms throughout the year. These pollination time periods are when those who suffer from a grass pollen allergy

notice their symptoms at their worst.

Types of Grass Pollen

There are hundreds of different kinds of grasses throughout the United States. Fortunately, not all of them are the source of summer sneezing, congestion, and itchy eyes. Some grass pollen types are small, light, dry and can travel for hundreds of miles by the wind. One group of grasses, referred to as the northern pasture grasses, cause more allergy problems than any others. These grasses include:

  • common timothy grass
  • sweet vernal grass
  • orchard grass
  • perennial rye grass
  • Kentucky bluegrass

Another type of grass, bermuda, is a southern grass and is responsible for many troubling summer grass allergy symptoms. Johnson grass is another main culprit for grass pollen misery.

Grass pollen allergy can make summertime miserable.
Grass pollen allergy can make summer time miserable for many.

Options for Homeowners

While common Bermuda grass usually triggers allergies, some hybridized versions produce little to no pollen. One common type of hybrid Bermuda grass referred to as the "Princess 77" variety is available for homeowners. Other good hybrid Bermuda grass varieties include "Tifway" and "Santa Ana". Buffalo grass may be a good warmer climate option. This warm-season grass survives droughts and requires little supplemental watering, making it ideal for areas with watering restrictions. Types like the "UC Verde" or "609" produces only female plants, eliminating the problems of flowering and producing pollen. Although less commonly found, this is ideal for grass pollen sufferers.

Measuring Grass Pollen Counts

Those that suffer from a grass pollen allergy can benefit from checking their local pollen counts regularly. Pollen counts are determined collecting pollen on special rods. The pollen is then counted under a microscope. The pollen count is then calculated in grains per cubic meter of air. Pollen counts tend to be the highest early in the day, or often when the wind picks up just before a large rainstorm.

If you like dancing in the rain, or jumping in rain puddles, however, you are in luck. During a rainstorm and immediately following, pollen becomes still and dormant due to the rain making it damp and heavy. As the air becomes warm and dry following the storm, the pollen count will become potent again

Manage Your Grass Pollen Allergy

Pollen counts are never zero, nor will an allergy sufferer truly be able to avoid grass pollen in the summer. However, some practices may help decrease pollen exposures. For instance, utilizing the air conditioner while keeping the windows and doors to the home and car closed. Also, utilizing the dryer rather than the fresh breeze to dry clothing will help to decrease pollen exposures. It is especially important to keep windows closed when you or someone close mowing their grass.

Although it may seem like a good idea to avoid cutting the grass as much as possible, mowing grass often and keeping grass short actually causes the grass to release less pollen into the air. If a nonallergic friend or family member isn’t available to assist in cutting your grass, consider wearing a mask. Wearing masks will help to minimize the amount of pollen reaching the nasal passages. It is greatly beneficial for grass pollen sufferers to wear a mask when cutting grass or doing other yardwork.

Other Helpful Tips

Those with a grass pollen allergy should try to avoid heavily dense grassy areas, especially in early summer when pollen is the most dense and abundant. Although summer brings warmer temperatures. when you are out working in the yard, out at a park, or hiking it is recommended to wear long pants or long sleeve shirts in a light breathable fabric. This added layer of protection helps reduce the amount of pollen that comes in direct contact with your skin. Similarly, wearing sunglasses and hats also reduce pollen that contacts eyes or nestles in your hair.

Grass pollen allergy suffers should also make a habit of changing their clothes after coming in from being outdoors, and bathing prior to getting into bed/laying on upholstered furniture. Wash bedding in very hot, sanitizing cycles once a week in peak pollen seasons. It is also beneficial to remove shoes before entering your home. And do not forget your pets! They can be major sources of tracking grass pollen into your home. Make sure to wipes them down with a wet cloth or towel before they enter your home, and make sure to bathe them more frequently in high pollen seasons. And although not always feasible, the ability to keep your pets from sleeping in your bed, in your bedroom, or on your upholstered furniture will also greatly benefit you if you suffer from grass pollen.

Symptom Relief is an Option

If someone is unsure whether grass pollen is a trigger for their troublesome nasal congestion, runny nose, postnasal drip, sneezing, and itchy watery eyes, seeing their provider for an allergy test may provide the clarity they are looking for!

Amanda Hofmann, MPAS, PA-C, is a graduate of Duquesne University, in Pittsburgh, PA. After spending 8 years in clinical practice, she joined United Allergy Services where she is currently the Vice President of Clinical. Amanda is also the past president of the Association of PAs in Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. 

United Allergy Services is also on FacebookLinkedInor TwitterSee other interesting and related articles on the UAS Blog.


Independence from Summer Allergies

Tips for independence from summer allergy concerns
Summer Allergy relief tips

The Fourth of July is only one week away and that likely means many are making or finalizing plans to be outside. Are you planning to be the grill master? How about the fireworks expert? Maybe you are the ultimate host of the celebration surrounded by family and friends enjoying fireworks, picnics, swimming, and outdoor activities. Here are some of the most common summer allergy tips to for attending Fourth of July celebrations. After all, it is your right to have independence from summer allergies!

Number One Summer Allergy: Grass Pollen 

During the summer months, many allergy sufferers are wary of grass pollen. They are the most common seasonal allergy triggers and are heaviest in May through August. Those that suffer from grass pollen allergies can benefit from checking their local pollen counts daily. Pollen counts tend to be the highest early in the day or as the wind picks up just before a large rainstorm.

Also, try to offer guests an indoor option during your outdoor celebration if possible. Try to offer a portion of the area where guests can sit away from tall/dense grass or shrubbery. Another options would be a non-grass surface like a deck or patio. To avoid bringing those pollens inside after a great celebration, take a shower or bath before hopping into bed. This will help rinse off any sticky allergens stuck to your body or hair before they stick to your bedding.

Summer Skin Allergy: Sunscreen Reactions

Many celebrations occur outside or around the pool, so sunscreen is important to discuss. While sunscreen is a crucial part of summer safety, sometimes it can cause a reaction much worse than a sunburn. A contact allergy to the sunscreen may present as a rash appearing where it was applied. Or it could be a reaction that appears after applying the sunblock and being exposed to the sun.

To avoid a sunscreen reaction, apply a quick and simple patch test before applying the product to your whole body. Decide on a small area, like the wrist, and apply the product. Wait at least 24 hours to make sure the skin does not react.

Summer Venom Allergy: Stinging Insects

Similar to sharing the festive star-spangled celebrations with pollen and sun, consider insects as well. We know stinging insects such as bees, wasps, hornets, and yellowjackets are most active during summer and early fall. Also, fire ants are active all year round in many southern parts of the United States.

For many of us stings and bites can be uncomfortable and painful. However, there are many picnic guests that have life-threatening reactions that can result from a sting or bite. People who know they are at risk should always carry two doses of auto injectable epinephrine. They should have the ability to access it within 60 seconds if necessary. Try to avoid the stings and bites before they occur by refraining from walking outdoors barefoot, especially in grassy areas. Another helpful trick is to skip perfume or sweet-smelling body sprays or lotions. Also, drinking from cans or bottles that have sat open and unattended should be avoided because sometimes insects can be an unpleasant surprise. Finally, when choosing the perfect outfit for the holiday weekend, leave your vivid, floral clothes in the closest.

Summer Asthma Concerns

When we think of the Fourth of July, firework displays lighting up the sky quickly come to mind. Fireworks, although beautiful and breathtaking, can create smoke and small particulate matter. This can trigger asthma for some, taking their breath away in a not so enjoyable way. If you suffer from asthma, consider watching the fireworks from an indoor location. Similar to fireworks, smoke from grills, bonfires, firepits, or outdoor fireplaces can also trigger asthma for some. Try to avoid the direct smoke pathway and leave significant distance between yourself and the source of the smoke.

Other scented products utilized during outdoor gatherings can also contribute to air pollution and can also trigger asthma. If hosting a party, it would be helpful to contact your guests and ask if certain things like scented insect repelling candles, scented tiki torch oil, odor hiding fragrances or air fresheners trigger any negative responses for them.

If there is a swimming pool, remember that while chlorine isn't an allergen, it is an irritant and can cause problems with eye and nose itching. It can also cause breathing problems in people with asthma. If undesired symptoms are occurring while swimming, jump out, take off your suit and washing the affected area with clean water and soap to remove traces of the remaining irritant. You should have a rescue inhaler on hand, if prescribed to you, to calm any respiratory symptoms should they occur.

Summer Food Allergy Considerations

Finally, what would a summer celebration be without all the tasty food and drinks? If food allergies are present, it can make attending picnics and barbeques easier to pack your own meals or snacks to have readily available. Preparing food, yourself is always the safest option, however, it may not be feasible may not allow you to feel you are enjoying all the perks of a summer celebration. It is helpful as a host to ask about any food allergies or dietary restrictions when inviting guests to the event. It is also very helpful to label what individual dishes or offers are and include a high-level recipe or ingredient list. That way guests can privately identify safe selections off the menu in and will allow them to enjoy immersing themselves in the full experience without the worry of unknown exposure.

Amanda Hofmann, MPAS, PA-C, is a graduate of Duquesne University, in Pittsburgh, PA. After spending 8 years in clinical practice, she joined United Allergy Services where she is currently the Vice President of Clinical. Amanda is also the past president of the Association of PAs in Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. 

United Allergy Services is also on FacebookLinkedIn, or Twitter. See other interesting and related articles on the UAS Blog.

 


5 ways to boost your healthcare practice in 2021

Every new year offers exciting possibilities, but it’s fair to assume that 2021 bears more anticipation than usual. At the center of the optimism is the arrival and distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine–and the return to normalcy it will bring to communities around the country.

For healthcare providers in particular this can be a welcome reset, as well as an opportunity to evaluate how they can be more successful moving forward. Priorities can be reassessed, and new efforts can be pursued to adapt to an evolving marketplace. While all won’t change with the turning of the calendar, providers can prepare to do the most with their practices–and for their patients–by considering the following tips in the new year.

1. Expand your care through value-added care services

While accomplishing all of the above can seem daunting for practices, especially smaller ones, finding the right partners in care can help.

A value-added care services company that complements your patient care, such as United Allergy Services, can do more than just expand your services. You can leverage their unique strengths and bolster your brand at the same time. With 2021 right around the corner, and greater opportunities ahead, there’s no better time to explore your options and maximize your patient and business outcomes in the new year.

2. Adapt to post-COVID changes in patient behavior and preferences

The COVID pandemic has highlighted the importance of flexibility, adaptability, and innovation for all business. Healthcare practices are no different. The providers we work with that have seen the most success have leveraged technologies and services that have made them more adaptable.

Practices have seen a shift to low-touch, high-quality care due to the health and safety concerns of the pandemic. Fewer in-clinic patient traffic has given way to more telemedicine appointments and other methods to engage with patients remotely. While that may revert somewhat to pre-COVID norms, it’s important for providers to continue to explore who they can more conveniently provide care.

The United Allergy Services mode of treatment is well-suited to that shift. Our allergen immunotherapy protocol, available as either allergy shots or drops, is designed to be safely administered at home. Once prescribed, our allergy drops can either be picked up during an in-office appointment or delivered directly from our central pharmacy, giving you further options on how to flexibly offer care. Once a patient is on our treatment, our dedicated app, myAllergyPal, allows patients to track and log doses, access their allergy test results, and manage future doses and appointments all in the palm of their hands.

3. Strengthen your brand

Brand loyalty applies to healthcare patients, too. With practices differentiating themselves more and more through services, technologies, marketing and other methods of patient engagement, providers should consider their own best methods to strengthen their branding.

4. Digitally engage with your patients

It’s no secret that more patients are spending more of their time online and on mobile. Why not interact with them in those same spaces to share updates about your practice, topical health tips, and other pieces of information related to their care? Use of social media, email marketing, text messaging, and more can be valuable ways to bolster your patient relationships.

5. Be agile

It’s a common theme throughout the tips above, but worth closing on here. While providers must already consider a variety of dynamics on a daily basis, from regulatory and payer issues to everything surrounding their patient care, it is more important than ever to adopt an agile business mindset. Be proactive, take note of broad shifts in patient preferences, and demonstrate the ability to adjust to those preferences.

As a value-added services company, United Allergy Services has looked to support providers with that mindset. Allergies are among the most prevalent chronic health conditions in the country, making allergy care just another component of primary care. By working with us, you can lean on our strengths and expand your care while you focus on what you do best. Our services incorporate a variety of testing and treatment options and are scaled for a range of provider needs and patient populations.

Want to learn more about how United Allergy Services can boost your business outcomes in 2021? Complete the contact form below today to speak with a member of our team.


    'Tis the season for Cedar Fever

    In parts of Texas and surrounding areas, cedar allergies are one last health challenge in an already difficult year.

    2020 has been one for the ages, headlined by the widespread impact of the COVID pandemic. While Americans and the rest of the world await a vaccine, there are other concerns that can impact their health in the coming months. One of those is cedar allergies.

    Winter is generally not considered a peak season for environmental allergies. Grasses pollenate in the summer months, ragweed pollenates in the fall, and most trees release their pollen in the spring months. However, one tree that does so between December and February is mountain cedar. According to Thermo Scientific, cedar is one of the primary allergens in Texas, especially around the Edwards Aquifer region. It can also be found in parts of southern Arkansas and Oklahoma.

    Cedar is identifiable by its amber-colored pollen, which becomes ubiquitous from December through February. Its effect, often known locally as “cedar fever”, can lead to symptoms like itchy, stuffy, and runny nose, as well as sneezing and itchy and watery eyes for allergy sufferers. In more serious cases, it can lead to sinus infections or trigger allergic asthma symptoms.

    In a climate where people are already hyper-conscious of their breathing symptoms, cedar allergies cause additional stress. Could that congestion and coughing be allergies, or something worse? Providers that offer allergy testing can not only offer their patients short-term peace of mind but a path to long-term relief from the symptoms that bother their patients, now and year-round.

    While many allergy sufferers will practice a combination of avoidance and self-medication to get through cedar season, those are only short-term measures to combat the symptoms rather than the disease. Allergen immunotherapy represents a path to a long-term better quality of life, including during cedar season. With concerns such as the flu and COVID existing simultaneously, patients have all the more reason to seek understanding--and relief.


    Rural communities are big winners with value-added care

    rural communities ancillary healthcare services

    Rural communities in the United States are often underserved when it comes to access to healthcare. That's why National Rural Health Day is important; it provides a chance to shine light on the health challenges faced in rural America.

    Among those factors are distance, transportation, economics, and health literacy. Together, they drastically limit Americans in those areas from accessing the care they need, which includes the kind of specialist care that has traditionally comprised allergy services.

    This places a large burden on rural Americans suffering from allergies. Those with the time and means must travel longer distances to receive care. And, due to the nature of in-office allergy treatment, that typically means multiple long trips a week in order to remain compliant.

    The National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health (NOSORH) estimates that number at 57 million. When you consider that roughly 30% of Americans, and 40% of children, may suffer from allergies, there are millions that stand to benefit from better access to allergy care is evident.

    A 2014 report from the Rural Policy Research Institute notes:

    "Barriers to access result in unmet health care needs, delays in receiving appropriate care, inability to get preventive services, and hospitalizations that could have been prevented."

    Value-added care services can provide an essential bridge for those communities and millions of Americans. By working with local practitioners, such as primary care providers, value-added care is a flexible way to bring a variety of services into areas that may not be able to support a standalone specialist practice.

    The benefit, of course, is passed along not only to patients but to those local practitioners. By adding quality care that their patients need, these practitioners are able to operate to the full extent of their license. As such, they stand to see great business outcomes.

    At United Allergy Services, we take pride in being an essential value-added services partner. Whether it is food or environmental allergy testing or our home-based model of allergy treatment, our scalable solutions allow providers to complement their care to the level that they can deliver it, and that their patients need it. By understanding those needs, we have been able to help deliver outstanding outcomes to providers and, consequently, their patients. That includes in rural communities, where access to quality allergy care is needed more than ever.


    How allergy care remains both accessible and essential during COVID

    The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact the entire country. Its effects have been uniquely felt in the healthcare industry, as providers reshape how they see patients and as Americans grow increasingly aware of their daily symptoms: is that lingering cough caused by a cold, the flu, or something worse? 

    These are difficult times for many, and that includes the tens of millions that suffer from allergies. For them, a better understanding of their symptoms--and long-term relief from those symptoms--can provide an improved quality of life. What often stands in the way is access to care, and how that access can fit within the new normal that we are all adapting to.

    United Allergy Services is proud to increase access to allergy care that is safe, effective, and adaptive to life in 2020 and beyond. UAS was recently featured in an SFGate article from last month, titled "Treat Your Allergy Symptoms from Home and Avoid COVID-19 Fears." The article notes the value our model of treatment offers to patients:

    "The good news? These days, many allergies can be safely identified with minimal visits to healthcare providers and then treated from home. And that could provide better relief from your symptoms as well as greater peace of mind."

    Thankfully, United Allergy Services (UAS) offers allergy testing and immunotherapy treatment in a safe, convenient way. By working through your general provider to develop a treatment protocol that can be self-administered, relief for allergy sufferers can happen with minimal visits to the provider's office or pharmacy. In fact, after the initial allergy test, which is administered in the general provider’s office, patients can undergo the majority of their treatment from the safety of their own homes.

    UAS works with primary care providers to offer in-office allergy testing, and our model of allergy treatment allows for patients to self-administer in the safety and convenience of their home, either through the use of allergy shots or our proprietary brand of allergy drops, Allergy Allay Drops.

    "If you’re struggling with the misery that can result from seasonal allergies, you’re far from alone. According to the CDC, more than 50 million Americans are now dealing with some kind of allergy, making such afflictions the sixth most prevalent cause of chronic illness in the country. And with symptoms that can be mistaken for the novel coronavirus, seasonal allergies could be causing even more stress and anxiety for sufferers."


    David Boone on at-home allergy shots as potential long-term relief from "cedar fever"

    Winter doesn't spell relief for all allergy sufferers -- especially in Texas and parts of other nearby states, where the colder weather signals the beginning of mountain cedar season.

    Cedar is one of the most severe allergens in areas where it is found. While locals will recognize the heavy, amber-colored pollen, it's allergy sufferers who will be more aware of its presence, often referring to its effects as "cedar fever".

    In a recent story on the annual return of cedar fever, Robbie Owens of CBS-DFW spoke with a local provider and patient who have seen first-hand the benefits of our at-home immunotherapy treatment. Those benefits include an improved quality of life and a treatment plan that fits into their lifestyle better.

    According to UAS provider, Margaret Holland, M.D. of Baylor Scott & White Family Medicine: “When a patient comes to me and they’re having daily allergy symptoms, something where they’re taking allergy medicine every day of the year, that’s when I recommend our allergy testing."

    "10 months out of the year felt like I had a bad cold, felt really sick; coughing, sinus headaches; the whole thing," says patient Deborah Romine of Fort Worth, who's featured in the story. "It's very convenient, very simple... “I feel better... People don’t get up and move away from me in restaurants because I’m coughing and blowing my nose! I wanted to wear a t-shirt that said, ‘I’m really not sick, it’s allergies’.​”

    United Allergy Services CEO David Boone is also featured in the story, going into more detail about our services and how we're helping allergy sufferers find long-term relief from their allergies. We encourage you to watch the video below and click on this link to read the story in full:

     

     


    David Boone speaks with MD Magazine about bridging the gap in allergy care

    What can primary care providers and companies like United Allergy Services do to address the allergy epidemic in this country? UAS's Chief Executive Officer, David Boone, recently discussed that and more in an interview with MD Magazine.

    "It's a lifestyle issue, it's a productivity issue, it's a health issue that leads to a lot of bad complications," Boone said in an interview at the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting.

    You can watch the interview below!


    United Allergy Services' Hugh Spires on providing counsel in a time of growth and innovation

    United Allergy Services' General Counsel and Vice President, Hugh Spires, recently spoke with Vanguard Law Magazine about the work we and the providers we work with are doing to improve lives, as well as the role he's played in helping UAS push new boundaries in allergy care. You can currently read the article by clicking here.

    The article begins by noting our model, which looks to help primary care providers address the gap in allergy care around the United States:

    "As Spires notes, more than 60 million Americans suffer from allergies—be they the result of food, animals, drugs, the environment or numerous other factors—and allowing people to receive treatment through their family doctor is more convenient and less costly. The company’s protocol is also safe enough to be administered at home, so patients don’t have to go to an allergist’s office every week. Because of this convenience, Spires notes, UAS patients complete treatment at a significantly higher rate than the national average, and they also have a significantly lower risk of an adverse reaction than if they received treatment from an allergist."

    One area of growth that Spires and the article reference is a point of great excitement at UAS: Allergy Allay Drops, our company's imminent foray into providing sublingual immunotherapy drops. These orally administered drops, still in the pilot test phase as of mid-November, will offer a needle-free alternative to our core service line of subcutaneous immunotherapy (allergy shots), allowing UAS and our providers to impact the lives of more allergy sufferers than ever. Of course, launching a new product line in the healthcare space requires a variety of considerations, including legal ones.

    "To ease fears around needles—and to accommodate patients with hectic schedules—the company has developed a proprietary formula for sub-lingual immunotherapy, or SLIT, in which drops are placed under a patient’s tongue. Because these would be among the first branded allergy therapy drops for humans, Spires is immersed in branding and copyright law, while establishing relationships with pilot clinics and working to trademark the name Allergy Allay Drops."

    As a member of our leadership team since 2016, Spires has been pivotal in providing legal direction while providing his daily guidance in all other matters to affect our company. We are proud of the work he does as our General Counsel and happy to see that effort highlighted by Vanguard.