Fall Allergies Expected To Be In Full Force

Flowers are no longer blooming, but that doesn’t mean allergies aren’t still in the air.

If you’re sneezing more, a fall allergy might be triggering your problem.

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8 Solutions For Miserable Mid-Workout Issues

Your nose outruns you

Just as you look at the weather forecast before exercising outside, allergy sufferers should get in the habit of checking the pollen count. (The Weather Channel, for example, routinely predicts this.) If an alert has been issued for your area, Frederick M. Schaffer, MD, chief medical officer of United Allergy Services in San Antonio, recommends adjusting your outdoor workouts accordingly. Pollen counts tend to peak between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m., he says, so avoiding this time can reduce symptoms by up to 50%. If your nose is running all the time, you may have non-allergic rhinitis, chronic sinusitis, or a virus, says Schaffer. To pinpoint the cause, ask your physician about having a simple skin-prick test done. If your symptoms are not allergy related, prescription medications such as nasal ipratropium bromide or nasal azelastine can help.

Full article link at Prevention.com


5 ways to tame seasonal allergies

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, about 40 million Americans are afflicted with seasonal allergies. NurseWise, a national multilingual nurse triage and health education provider, has assembled a few helpful tips to help you proactively manage your exposure and response to allergens and allergy triggers.

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Recent storms may cause a spike in allergy suffering

PHOENIX -- Like many people in the valley, Stephanie Rusden suffers from allergies.

"[I'm] always stuffed up, eyes are always red and so I have to worry about that," Rusden said.

To get by, she has to do a couple of different things.

"I try Claritin, but it doesn't really help, and then I take Benadryl for night and red eyes," she said.

With the recent storms dumping an enormous amount of rain, Rusden's allergies might spike as new plants start to sprout, grow and bloom.

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Study finds thunderstorms worsen asthma, allergy symptoms

In one of the first studies of its kind done in the United States, a University of Georgia professor teamed up with faculty at Emory University to research the effect thunderstorms can have on people with asthma and allergies.

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Achoo: Seasonal allergies on the rise

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) - The feeling of Autumn is already in the air…but so is pollen.

Seasonal allergies, otherwise known as "hay fever" has nothing to do with hay nor fever. Symptoms are similar to the common cold including sneezing, itchy throat and runny or stuffy nose.

According to Dr. Rajiv Arora of Family Allergy & Asthma in Lexington, ragweed pollen is the main culprit.

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The Gross Truth About How Often You Should Replace Your Pillow

The question: How often should I replace my pillow?

The answer: Nearly 70 percent of people say a comfortable pillow is very important to a good night's sleep, but many of us make a crucial mistake when it comes to our favorite pillows: We're keeping them for way too long.

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Heavy rains bring bad news for allergy sufferers

The heavy rains this monsoon season have been great for New Mexico. Putting a major league dent in the drought, along with making the state look greener, but it's been very bad for allergy sufferers.

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Allergy Update: Preparing for your child for Back to School

UAS is in the news! UAS Chief Medical Officer Dr. Frederick Schaffer shares information on preparing children for back to school. The article is featured in the July/August 2014 issue of NSIDE magazine, a Texas-based business and healthcare magazine. See the PDF and online preview below.

NSIDE TXMD: July/August 2014


Kids From Dairy Farms Have Lower Allergy Risk, Study Finds

TUESDAY, July 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children raised on dairy farms are much less likely to develop allergies than other youngsters, a new study finds.

Researchers tracked children who lived in rural areas of Sweden, half of them on dairy farms, from birth until 3 years of age. Children on dairy farms had one-tenth the risk of developing allergies as other rural youngsters.

"Our study also demonstrated for the first time that delayed maturation of the immune system, specifically B-cells, is a risk factor for development of allergies," researcher Anna-Carin Lundell, of the University of Gothenburg, said in a university news release.

She and her colleagues found that children who had allergies at ages 18 to 36 months had higher levels of immature B-cells in their blood at birth and during the first month of life.

Further research is needed to learn more about the association between delayed B-cell maturation early in life and increased risk of developing allergies, the researchers said. While a link was found between fewer allergies and growing up on dairy farms, it didn't prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

"We need to identify the specific factors on dairy farms that strengthen protection against allergies and appear to promote maturation of the immune system as early as the fetal stage," Lundell said.

The study was recently published in the Journal of Immunology.

Allergy rates in Western nations have risen dramatically in recent years. One widely held explanation for this trend is that children are less exposed to microorganisms and have fewer infections, resulting in delayed maturation of their immune system, according to background information in the news release.

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By Robert Preidt
July 15, 2014
health.usnews.com