Achoo: Seasonal allergies on the rise

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) - The feeling of Autumn is already in the air…but so is pollen.

Seasonal allergies, otherwise known as "hay fever" has nothing to do with hay nor fever. Symptoms are similar to the common cold including sneezing, itchy throat and runny or stuffy nose.

According to Dr. Rajiv Arora of Family Allergy & Asthma in Lexington, ragweed pollen is the main culprit.

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State Honor Roll 2014

State Honor Roll 2014

 

 

 

 

The State Honor Roll of Asthma and Allergy Policies for schools,  www.StateHonorRoll.org, is an annual research project of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), sponsored by Mylan Specialty, L.P., to help identify states with the most comprehensive and preferred statewide public policies supporting people with asthma, food allergies, anaphylaxis and related allergic diseases in U.S. elementary, middle and high schools. The goal of this report is to identify state-level progress towards better school-based policies, and to provide a blueprint for advocates nationwide.

Get Involved! Review the report, find out where your state stands on policies protecting people with asthma and allergies, see the links to resources below, and take action today!

THE 2014 HONOR ROLL LIST

Eight states and the District of Columbia are named to AAFA's Honor Roll this year. Congratulations to: Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Mississippi (new), New Jersey, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington and West Virginia (new). Click on the interactive map and the additional resource links for detailed reports for all 50 states and DC, comprehensive reports for the Honor Roll states, study methodology and more.

The 2014 report is made possible by a generous sponsorship from Mylan Specialty L.P., and additional support from Genentech and individual donations to AAFA from patients, families and supporters.

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aafa.org
August 14, 2014


The Gross Truth About How Often You Should Replace Your Pillow

The question: How often should I replace my pillow?

The answer: Nearly 70 percent of people say a comfortable pillow is very important to a good night's sleep, but many of us make a crucial mistake when it comes to our favorite pillows: We're keeping them for way too long.

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Heavy rains bring bad news for allergy sufferers

The heavy rains this monsoon season have been great for New Mexico. Putting a major league dent in the drought, along with making the state look greener, but it's been very bad for allergy sufferers.

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Study: Allergy symptoms while driving may be same as .03 BAC

AUSTIN, Texas -- Sneezing, itchy, watery eyes are among the negative symptoms associated with allergies. As if that's not bad enough, now a new study says pollen allergies can impair your driving to the point where you compare to drivers with a blood alcohol content of .03.

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Allergy Update: Preparing for your child for Back to School

UAS is in the news! UAS Chief Medical Officer Dr. Frederick Schaffer shares information on preparing children for back to school. The article is featured in the July/August 2014 issue of NSIDE magazine, a Texas-based business and healthcare magazine. See the PDF and online preview below.

NSIDE TXMD: July/August 2014


Kids From Dairy Farms Have Lower Allergy Risk, Study Finds

TUESDAY, July 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children raised on dairy farms are much less likely to develop allergies than other youngsters, a new study finds.

Researchers tracked children who lived in rural areas of Sweden, half of them on dairy farms, from birth until 3 years of age. Children on dairy farms had one-tenth the risk of developing allergies as other rural youngsters.

"Our study also demonstrated for the first time that delayed maturation of the immune system, specifically B-cells, is a risk factor for development of allergies," researcher Anna-Carin Lundell, of the University of Gothenburg, said in a university news release.

She and her colleagues found that children who had allergies at ages 18 to 36 months had higher levels of immature B-cells in their blood at birth and during the first month of life.

Further research is needed to learn more about the association between delayed B-cell maturation early in life and increased risk of developing allergies, the researchers said. While a link was found between fewer allergies and growing up on dairy farms, it didn't prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

"We need to identify the specific factors on dairy farms that strengthen protection against allergies and appear to promote maturation of the immune system as early as the fetal stage," Lundell said.

The study was recently published in the Journal of Immunology.

Allergy rates in Western nations have risen dramatically in recent years. One widely held explanation for this trend is that children are less exposed to microorganisms and have fewer infections, resulting in delayed maturation of their immune system, according to background information in the news release.

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By Robert Preidt
July 15, 2014
health.usnews.com

 


Is Your Air Conditioning Causing Your Allergies?

Summer is back, and so are many peoples’ allergies.

While people often suffer from spring allergies related to pollen, it’s not uncommon for people to suffer from allergies related to dust, dust mites, and animal dander. These allergens aren’t necessarily coming from the spring and summer conditions, rather they can be originating from inside your own house.

In 2013, American News Report reported a potential cause of allergies that can be easily addressed. With children being especially susceptible to allergies, we believe the message is worth repeating during this allergy season. At most, it may help prevent some allergies. At least, you’ll breath easier knowing there may be some relatively inexpensive ways of improving the air quality within your house.

Originally posted on American News Report, May 21, 2013 –

Children are most susceptible to allergies, and spring is one of the worst times for plant pollen allergies. Some doctors call Spring and Summer, “peak allergy season.”

“Food and skin allergies are on the rise and respiratory allergies are the most common type of allergy affecting children,” according to a report from the CDC published on May 2, 2013. There was a greater number of food and respiratory allergies with increased income, according to co-author LaJeana Howie, from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the CDC.

Allergens can be in the carpet and also in the heating and air-conditioning vents in the family home. In some cases the quality of the air outside is not as bad as the air inside the home.

Children’s immune systems are still developing and so when a child sneezes or coughs and it’s not a cold or a virus that’s a sign that dust and other allergens may have reached a critical point in your home. It can take adults longer to show the symptoms of dust, dander and pollen allergies.

“Allergy Moms” say that taking care of a child with allergies is always a challenge because they never feel sure footed, the sand is always shifting. Even if a child has severe allergies such as a food allergy to peanuts or dairy it’s not unusual for the child to be allergic to many other different things to varying degrees. Even though and allergy mom may have “allergy proofed” their own home there’s always a good chance that air with allergens is going to come into the home and then be spread through the heating and air conditioning ducts.

Mark Masters, president of a professional carpet and duct cleaning company, says that the most common items they find in the home duct system are leftovers from the construction process. This can include dust from drywall, sawdust, concrete dust, as well as pollens and air particulates that were deposited during construction. Many of these particulates could be an allergen for a child, adult, or senior.

After you’ve taken your children or yourself to your family doctor there are other steps you can take that will mitigate the effects of these allergens. One important action you can take is to have your cooling and heating air ducts cleaned by a professional.

Another step you can take is an allergen filter system. Some of the better systems feature multistage allergen filtration. This type of system will remove allergens, particulates and contaminants by using a fan that runs continuously and circulates the air. Combined with an anti-allergen filter that effectively traps dust, allergens and other particulates such as dust mite droppings and dog dander indoor air quality can be improved.

If you’re like most people, changing a filter is a hassle that we’d rather avoid. Now there is technology that addresses that, it’s a ductless air conditioning system, which works only in the rooms where you are. This not only creates a healthier environment but a more economical one.

Doctors say that some allergy symptoms could be symptoms of something more serious. That includes a sinus infection or an upper respiratory infection. So seeing your family doctor first, and then taking steps to make the air better in your home, is the right order to get things done as we move into the spring and summer allergy season.

Doctors and other researchers are doing extensive studies to understand the risks and methods for preventing these allergies according to the CDC report.

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July 14, 2014americannewsreport.com


8 Summer Miseries Made Worse by Global Warming, From Poison Ivy to Allergies

With average global temperatures expected to rise more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) over the coming decades, a new report from a leading U.S. environmental group warns that future summers are likely to be filled with more misery, from more prolific poison ivy and biting insects to worsened air and water quality and impacts on tourism.

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Study finds link between stress and allergy flare-ups

(NaturalNews) Allergy sufferers may want to focus on positive thoughts and stress reduction to find relief for their runny noses and itchy, watery eyes.

According to researchers at Ohio State University, there's a link between people's stress levels and bad moods and the frequency of their allergy flare-ups, or flares. (1) In the study, 179 patients were analyzed for three months by experts at the university, 39 percent of whom had more than one allergy flare. This group experienced higher stress than the group without allergy symptoms, and, all told, 64 percent of them had more than four flares over the course of 28 days. (1) Typically, the flares came within just a few short days of exposure to stress.

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