MySA story highlights United Allergy Services' role in the allergy space

In July, United Allergy Services was featured in a story on mySA.com. The first section of the article, titled "How immunotherapy is changing lives for people with allergies", looks at the allergy epidemic in America:

"Allergies pose a genuine health risk beyond stuffy noses and itchy, watery eyes. Those with intense allergic symptoms find their quality of life drastically affected, leading to missed school and work days, or even emergency room visits. Severe allergy sufferers may experience intense congestion, sneezing, hives or eczema, plus difficulty breathing. Of the 26 million Americans who suffer from asthma, around 60% have allergic asthma, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, meaning that the serious, life-threatening respiratory distress of asthma is triggered by allergic reactions to pollen and other substances."

The article goes on to explain the history of allergen immunotherapy and how it can still play a role in bridging the gap in allergy care:

"More than a century later, only 20% of allergy sufferers see an allergy specialist. And those that do must stick to a regimented schedule of frequent in-office visits for treatment for it to be effective. Now, innovation in allergy immunotherapy means patients can be tested by their general practitioner instead of seeking out a specialist, and then conduct their own treatment at home. That makes it more convenient to not only seek treatment but also stay committed to the immunotherapy protocol as it helps their bodies build up resistance to the allergens that impact their lives. At-home immunotherapy allows allergy sufferers to treat themselves over time."

The piece closes with a look at the efficacy of UAS's treatment program, including a quote from one patient whose quality of life has benefited from immunotherapy:

"Tiffany Conner of North Carolina says, 'I have lived with allergies my entire life and now I have almost no symptoms. Going through at-home immunotherapy treatment was the best decision I could have made.'"

You can read the entire story from mySA.com by clicking here.


2018 forecasts call for longer allergy seasons

2018 forecasts call for longer allergy seasons


March 12, 2018

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American allergy sufferers have come to know what to expect throughout the year – oak in spring; grass over the late spring and early summer months; ragweed in late summer through autumn; cedar in fall through winter – as their fluctuating symptoms follow the changing of the seasons.

Recent years, however, have seen significant shifts in allergy seasons, with some occurring earlier in the year and others lasting longer than normal. With global pollen counts also on the rise, these changes paint a slightly different picture for allergy sufferers around the country. Here’s what you need to know as you look ahead to the rest of 2018.

Earlier spring allergies

For several years, spring allergies have been occurring earlier. That means plants and trees, many of which bud when temperatures get warm enough, flowering weeks ahead of schedule and releasing more pollen into the air.

Punxsutawney Phil may have recently called for six more weeks of winter, but that will not likely apply to spring allergies in 2018. In Nevada, pollen monitors have already registered unseasonably high counts, signaling an early start to this spring allergy season. A February report in New Orleans highlighted a high number of hospitalizations due to allergies, while doctors in Orlando believe their city could be entering “one of the worst allergy seasons ever.”

Longer weed pollination seasons

Warmer temperatures don’t just mean earlier springs – they also mean milder autumns, which lead to longer pollination seasons for ragweed and other weeds.

Ragweed is an allergenic plant that pollinates in tropical and subtropical climates, typically the season lasts from August through October. It is one of the most common causes of allergic rhinitis (hay fever) for millions of Americans in the autumn months. Ragweed thrives in warmer temperatures and is dispersed by the wind, with each plant capable of producing up to one billion pollen grains. Its pollen has been found as far as 400 miles out to sea and 2 miles up in the atmosphere.

With longer autumns come longer ragweed seasons. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the EPA found a dramatic increase in ragweed seasonacross many parts of the United States and Canada, with select areas experiencing almost a month more of ragweed season.

Changes in climate have not only affected when ragweed season occurs; they may also be extending where it occurs. In Europe, the far-reaching weed is expected to become more prevalent in new geographical regions that are becoming more climatically hospitable to it. Such a development would impact millions of people in countries like Denmark, France, Germany and Russia who are not currently exposed to it.

Higher year-round pollen counts

Underlying these two seasonal shifts is an expectation in the scientific community that year-round pollen counts will only continue to rise in the coming decades. A 2012 report by the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology found that pollen counts are expected to more than double by 2040.

“In the year 2000, pollen counts averaged 8,455. Fast forward to 2040, and these counts are anticipated to reach 21,735. Researchers predict counts in 20-year increments up to the year 2100 and are incorporating various climatic factors in their models including weather patterns, changes in precipitation and temperature.”

For allergy sufferers with allergic asthma, higher pollen counts inevitably leads to increased risk and severity of asthma attacks, along with worsened symptoms on a week-to-week basis.

What can you do to prepare?

With more intense allergy seasons on the future forecast, people with airborne allergies will benefit from preparing as best they can. The first step is knowing what their sensitivities are, ideally by undergoing an allergy test. By doing so, you will understand the times of year that you’re most at risk and be able to plan their avoidance accordingly.

There’s also a number of allergy treatment options you can explore, from over-the-counter medications to allergen immunotherapy. While the former can help you combat symptoms on a daily basis, the latter offers a long-term solution – one which may be all the more necessary given the changes in the air.


5 interesting cases of allergic cross-reactivity

5 interesting cases of allergic cross-reactivity


February 2, 2018

Allergy sufferers cope with their sensitivities in a number of ways, from over-the-counter medication and immunotherapy treatment to simple avoidance. Yet, even if a person was to employ every known method of avoidance, it’s still possible he or she would still experience an allergic reaction at a time when an allergen is nowhere to be seen.

The reason why is cross-reactivity, a phenomenon in which “the proteins in one substance are similar to the proteins found in another substance”. That means that a person allergic to a particular pollen may see a similar reaction after eating a nut, spice, or piece of fruit that is cross-reactive with that particular pollen.

When we consume a cross-reactive protein, the ensuing reaction is known as oral allergy syndrome, or pollen-food allergy syndrome. Oral allergy syndrome can be triggered by a variety of foods that many of us eat on a daily basis, resulting in mild to moderate symptoms that range from swelling and itching around the mouth to watery eyes and runny noses.

With that in mind, here are five cases of cross-reactivity to keep an eye out for the next time you’re at the grocery store.

1. Cypress pollen and peaches, citrus fruits

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A recently discovered cross-reactivity according to Science Daily, peaches and citrus fruits such as oranges have demonstrated a possibility for allergic reactions. For people with cypress allergies, that is an issue not only when eating raw citrus fruits but when eating fruit-based products such as jams and marmalades.

2. Ragweed and melons, bananas, cantaloupe

Weeds are cross-reactive with a number of foods, and the association between ragweed and these sweet fruits is among the most common. Ragweed season typically occurs between late summer through fall, but ragweed allergy sufferers may find themselves facing similar symptoms after biting into a banana or slice of melon or cantaloupe.

3. Grass and watermelon, melons, tomatoes and oranges

Grasses like Timothy and Johnson can wreak havoc on allergy sufferers. So, too, can their cross-reactive cousins in the produce aisle of your local supermarket.

4. Birch and peanuts, hazelnuts

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Many people suffer from common peanut allergies, while some may actually be allergic to birch tree pollen, which shares a similar protein to both peanuts and hazelnuts. According to PeanutAllergy.com, cooked and roasted nuts may also pose a threat, since their proteins are less sensitive to heat than others.

5. Mugwort and spices (anis, basil, chamomile, cilantro, dill, fennel, oregano, paprika, parsley, pepper, tarragon, thyme, and more)

Looking to spice up your life? It’s advised that you make sure you’re not allergic to mugwort, a weed that is cross-reactive with a number of spices you’ll find in your cupboard.

There are many other cross-reactive associations not listed here, which is why it’s important to understand both what your allergic sensitivities are, and what fruits, vegetables, nuts or spices they may be associated with.

Allergy awareness and avoidance are two positive steps you can take to combat allergies in your day-to-day life, but a better understanding of cross-reactivity is also important, helping ensure you know what to pick up – and what not to pick up – the next time you go grocery shopping.


spring allergy capital of america

Christmas Tree Syndrome

Christmas Tree Syndrome


November 30, 2017

One of the early signs the holidays are coming is the sight of Christmas trees popping up in homes around your neighborhood. For some, that means pulling an artificial tree out of a box; for others, it means heading to the nearby tree farm to pick up a real one. Whichever you prefer, there are important tips to keep in mind that can make the holidays a lot happier for the allergy sufferers in your life.

Let’s look at the pros and cons for each option, and see which yuletide centerpiece could be best for you and your family.

 

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Some people will settle for nothing less than a real tree for the holidays, and it’s understandable why. You get to take the family to pick one out – or even cut one down yourself – and they have a wonderful scent that fills your home.

While it may be easy to blame your fresh Christmas tree for the allergy symptoms that arrive with it, conifers are seldom an important allergen. Mold is likely to blame. In a 2016 Connecticut study, researchers observed a dramatic increase in mold spore count in the two weeks after a Christmas tree was brought indoors:

“The study found that the mold spore count was 800 spores per square meter for the first three days. Normal spore counts are less than 1,000 spores per square meter. However, the spore count rose after day four, reaching a maximum of 5,000 spores per square meter by day 14.”

With those findings, it’s no surprise the article suggests avoidance may be the best measure for people with mold allergies:

“If one is mold-allergic, running an air cleaner in the same room as the tree could theoretically reduce the mold exposure, but this has not been studied… For some people who are sensitive to odors, the aroma from the tree, which most people like, could irritate their nose and cause symptoms. For these people, avoiding live trees may be best.”

What else can be done? For starters, reduce the amount of time that the tree is in your home by bringing the tree in just before Christmas and removing it the day after. The authors of a 2007 study suggested another simple solution: shaking as much debris as possible out of the tree before bringing it inside.

Elsewhere, those who have suffered from tree-related allergies have found some success in rinsing off the tree with a hose and sprayer, and then leaving the tree somewhere warm to dry for a couple of days before bringing it into the house. Using an air compressor to blow off debris might be an excellent alternative to avoid having to dry the tree out afterward.

And don’t forget: spray snow, like any aerosolized chemical, is an irritant that can cause reactions in your eyes, nose and lungs.

 

The Lookalikes

christmas-993304_1280There are others who favor having an artificial tree to display their Christmas cheer. They’re easy to assemble, and come in so many different shapes and sizes. On top of that, there aren’t any pesky dry pine needles on the floor to clean up. Most importantly, once the holidays are over, you can store it and use it year after year. With so many benefits, it’s easy to see why this is a popular choice.

The first year with a new artificial tree should be allergy-free. How you store the tree year after year will affect the allergens that it may bring into your home in the following years. Just like anything else you store in your garage or attic until its next use, it sits there and gathers dust. Lots of dust.

Dust and dust mites are among the most common triggers of allergic reactions, as well as the most common cause of asthma in children, according to the ACAAI. Can you imagine how much dust your tree has gathered since last year? That’s why, before adorning that artificial tree with tinsel and lights, a thorough clean is a must.

Another potential allergen that could be lurking in your stored artificial tree: cockroach. Cockroaches thrive in nice dark and warm places, such as the cardboard box you may be storing your tree in. Cardboard boxes are not only considered a nice place to live by cockroaches – they’re also a food source for them.

An air compressor can be used to blow off accumulated allergens before retrieving the tree from your closet or attic. If you opt to spray down your artificial tree with a hose, be sure to let it thoroughly dry outside the home before bringing it in to avoid mold. It is also recommended that you swap out the cardboard box that your tree came in for a storage bag that is moisture, dust, and pet resistant.

 

So, which option is better? Well, it depends on a person’s sensitivities. If you’re unsure if you suffer from mold, dust, or cockroach allergies, the easiest way to find out is to ask your doctor to perform an allergy skin test. It’s quick, and you’ll have your results before you walk out of the office.

Beyond that, keeping the air clear by replacing filters and opening the occasional window should also help, regardless of which tree you choose.

By understanding the pros and cons of each option, and by learning more about the allergies that could be affecting you or your loved ones, you can help ensure the only sniffles during this holiday season are of the merry, heartfelt kind.


How to Minimize Dog Shedding

How to Minimize Dog Shedding


June 2, 2017

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May is Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month

May is Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month


May 2, 2017

The facts are staggering:

  • 1 in 5 Americans are affected by Asthma and Allergies1.
  • 1 in 10 children have asthma2.
  • Asthma and Allergy are the leading cause of missed school and work days3.

We are all familiar with the typical allergy symptoms; however, allergies can also manifest as fatigue, trouble focusing, depression, slowed thinking, ear infections, and dark circles/puffiness under the eyes.

Take the month of May to focus on potential Asthma and Allergy symptoms to improve the quality of life of your patients!

Sources:

  1. AAFA
  2. CDC. National Surveillance of Asthma: United States, 2001-2010. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_03/sr03_035.pdf.
  3. [1] Centers for Disease Control. Asthma. http://www.cdc.gov/asthma/default.htm.


Mylan Issues a Voluntary Recall for Epi Pen and Epi Pen Jr.

Mylan Issues a Voluntary Recall for Epi Pen and Epi Pen Jr.


April 13, 2017

As of March 31, 2017, Mylan Pharmaceuticals has issued a voluntary recall for Epi Pen and Epi Pen Jr, epinephrine autoinjectors, from 13 specified lots.

FILE – In this July 8, 2016, file photo, a pharmacist holds a package of EpiPens epinephrine auto-injector, a Mylan product, in Sacramento, Calif. Mylan CEO Heather Bresch is defending the cost for life-saving EpiPens and is offering no suggestion that there are plans to lower prices. Bresch’s prepared testimony was released by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee ahead of her Sept. 21 appearance before the panel. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

The recall is due to a potential defective part that would result in the devices’ failure to activate. Although there have been a small number of defective devices reported, Mylan is taking proactive actions to ensure the safety of their products.

The recalled products were distributed between Dec. 17, 2015 and July 1, 2016. Please check your epinephrine autoinjectors and compare with the Mylan Site for lot numbers and steps to return and replace your defective epinephrine autoinjector.

For additional information please view the FDA’s official press release, here.


Empowering Physicians to Fight Seasonal Allergies with Immunotherapy

Empowering Physicians to Fight Seasonal Allergies with Immunotherapy


June 1, 2015

“UAS is providing a way for primary care physicians to test and treat their patients with chronic allergic symptoms in a way that is safe and effective, while improving their quality of life.” Here, John Thresher of United Allergy Services sets the record straight.

See the full article


NEW PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLE DEMONSTRATES SAFETY OF SELF-ADMINISTERED ALLERGY SHOTS

NEW PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLE DEMONSTRATES SAFETY OF SELF-ADMINISTERED ALLERGY SHOTS


December 17, 2014

(Dec. 16, 2014) SAN ANTONIO – United Allergy Services (UAS) ®, a leading healthcare services company assisting family physicians and health systems to deliver safe and effective allergy testing and customized immunotherapy services, today announced the publication of an original article that analyzes the safety of implementing a self-administration protocol of allergen immunotherapy characterized by patient pre-selection and a slow buildup process. The peer-reviewed article written by Frederick M. Schaffer, M.D., a board certified allergist and lead investigator of the study, Andrew Naples and Larry Garner has been published online in the International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology.

The article, “The safety of self-administered allergen immunotherapy during the buildup and maintenance phases” concludes that the risk of systemic, or adverse, reaction is lower with UAS treatment protocol than traditional dosage and fast buildup, or RUSH, methods that involve immunotherapy shots administered at a physician’s office. The UAS protocol in the study was administered by primary care physicians and is characterized by self-administration at home. Investigators conclude that the results are driven by UAS patient pre-selection to exclude those with a high risk of adverse reactions and slower, more incremental, immunotherapy buildup phase as a self-administered treatment for patients suffering from seasonal and perennial allergies.

The article states, “The enhanced safety of this protocol results in a decreased frequency and severity of adverse reactions. This safety report corroborates and expands the observations of previous studies of self-administered, subcutaneous immunotherapy in a low-risk patient population by assessing self-administered allergen immunotherapy during the buildup and maintenance phases.”

Until recently, the only real relief for allergies and allergic asthma remained primarily in the hands of allergists who administer immunotherapy shots. This already small community of approximately 5,000 U.S. specialists is expected to decline 6.8 percent by 2020, while demand for allergy-related services is projected to grow 35 percent in the same timeframe. This forecast only scratches the surface of the true demand for allergy and asthma care, as only a portion of the approximately 60 million Americans suffering from allergic rhinitis are aware of their condition and seek specialty care.

About United Allergy Services
United Allergy Services ® (UAS) brings effective and convenient allergy testing and immunotherapy to primary care physicians, pulmonologists, ENT physicians, pediatricians, internal medicine physicians, and healthcare systems that treat the vast majority of patients with seasonal and perennial allergies. UAS’ complete service line features in-office UAS Certified Clinical Allergy Technician staffing and training; quality assurance and compliance; and supply and inventory management. By collaborating with physicians to safely administer allergy testing and shots, UAS has assisted the expansion of access to effective allergy care for thousands of patients that suffer from seasonal and perennial allergies.

“Allergist-Immunologists.” US News. U.S.News & World Report, n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2013.

“Number of Board Certified Allergists in the United States.” American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Dec. 2013. .

Allergist report.(n.d.). Retrieved from http://college.acaai.org/SiteCollectionDocuments/PDF/AllergistReport.pdf


Allergy season not quite over yet

Sneezing, itchy nose and watery eyes — each a symptom of allergic rhinitis.

Coined “hay fever” after farmers would commonly experience these fever-type symptoms working out in the fields, seasonal allergies has symptoms country boy Craig Anderson has experienced all his life.

“We would play in the weeds until our eyes got so inflamed that we couldn’t even find our way home. It was kind of the question of the blind leading the blind, trying to find our way home," he said. "But we managed it.”

Johnnie Cook, M.D., said seasonal allergies are caused by pollens in the air: “What happens is that you breathe in that pollen and your body has a reaction because it thinks that’s a foreign thing.”

In the springtime, grass and tree pollens are high. Pollen from weeds trickle in as early as August and sticks around until the first hard frost," he explained. Symptoms include itchy nose, sneezing, itchy eyes and nasal congestion, and seasonal allergies can lead to irritability and trouble sleeping.

“There are studies where we see more allergies and more asthma now than we used to in the past.” Cook said although there are no official studies yet available, he suspects the reasoning may be attributed to more pollution and kids spending more time indoors than playing outside.

Cook added that allergies can come at any age, typically after you've been exposed for several years. Thirty to 40 percent of seasonal allergies can be treated with over-the-counter medications. The doctor urges reading labels closely and pay special attention to how long the medication lasts.

“Some studies show that Benadryl in a 25 mg. dose can be as impairing as alcohol at a legal limit,” Cook said. If symptoms persist, make an appointment with your doctor to explore the one of the many options for treatment. “There are some great solutions out there. (Allergy sufferers) should really seek a physician rather than be miserable and miss out on life. Life’s too precious.”

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By Jenniffer Michaelson, KSL
October 14, 2014
heraldtimesonline.com