Alternative Business Models Keep Doctors in Business and Thriving

As doctors weigh whether to stay in their practices or become employed in a group practice or at a hospital, they’re increasingly looking to alternative business models in order to remain – and thrive.

“Especially as the industry evolves, physicians and practice staff may be looking at alternative business models,” said Todd Evenson, data solutions director for the Medical Group Management Association.

Read more


Reduced Physician Compensation and Other Trends in Primary Care

Primary care forms the backbone of the nation’s healthcare system, providing patients with information about preventive and self-care strategies and ideally coordinating care with specialists and other providers. Yet as 32 million more Americans prepare to join the ranks of the insured, the country not only lacks sufficient numbers of primary-care physicians, but medical students increasingly are choosing to specialize.

Read more


The opportunity for in-office allergy testing and treatment

In an age when many physician practices face tightening business margins, some are exploring new services they may be able to offer patients. One such area is the in-office treatment of patients who suffer from allergic rhinitis.

Read more


Partnering with an Outside Specialist

Some days, even Andrew Minigutti, MD, forgets that his practice’s allergy specialist isn’t one of his actual employees. Instead, she is an outside employee working out of Minigutti’s Plano, Texas practice to the benefit of not only the patients, but the doctors as well.

Read more


United Allergy Services Teams Up with the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative As an Executive Committee Member

San Antonio, Texas — October 3, 2012 United Allergy Services (UAS)™, the leading healthcare services company empowering physicians and health systems to deliver safe and effective allergy testing and customized immunotherapy services, today announced it has joined the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative (PCPCC) as an Executive Committee member. The Executive Committee guides the efforts of the PCPCC, which aims to advance an effective health system built on a strong foundation of primary care and the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH). Through this collaboration, UAS will become a profound contributor to the PCMH movement and will help to shape the organization’s advocacy efforts. UAS will also be further empowered to promote awareness of allergy conditions and the need for coordinated allergy care across the healthcare continuum.

Read more


Dealing with allergies in the Allergy Capital

Knoxville ranks first in the nation, but no one is cheering. Instead, many of us are reaching for tissue, over-the-counter antihistamines, and a neti pot.

Read more


Immunotherapy for Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis is often the first symptom of allergic disease, commonly affecting young children, typically before 5 years of age. Atopic dermatitis is triggered by allergies to foods and environmental allergens (such as pollen, molds, pet dander and dust mites) in 85 percent of affected people. In many children with atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis will begin to develop at school age, and some of these children will develop asthma by adolescence. This progression of allergic disease is called the "atopic march". There has been some success at stopping the atopic march through the use of medications and immunotherapy (allergy shots).

Read more


Asthma and Your Allergies

 

Have you wondered why every time your nasal allergies act up your asthma does too?

The connection between asthma and nasal allergy symptoms of allergic rhinitis, commonly called "hay fever," has been the subject of many epidemiological investigations, identifying a significant overlap between these diseases.

Read more


The Biggest Mistake Parents Make In Preventing Asthma in Children

The start of spring may be bad news for the over 60 million seasonal allergy sufferers in the U.S., but allergies among children are the most worrisome - they are largely responsible for the growing number of children suffering from asthma. An estimated 6.5 million Americans under the age of 18 suffer from asthma, making it the most common chronic illness in childhood. It is the main reason children miss school and the leading cause of childhood hospitalization.

Read more


The Worst Cities For Allergies In 2012

Each year, 40 million Americans suffer from seasonal allergies, when airborne irritants trigger an overreaction of the immune system, marked by itchy, watery eyes, violent sneezing, coughing, wheezing, severe nasal or sinus congestion and, in some cases, difficulty breathing.

Read more