I have worked with UAS 8...

I have worked for UAS for almost 8 years now and could not be more grateful for the opportunities I have had to learn, help patients and grown in my own career development! UAS provides such a valuable service to patients suffering with allergies and to physician partners who desire to help their patients live healthy, happy lives. Seeing patients feel better as they actually treat their allergies rather than just mask them with medications, I have had the opportunity to work with some of the most amazing people! The teams are truly like family and so supportive. We make a difference every day in what we do and we do it together and that has been such a wonderful thing to get to be a part of for the last 8 years. No job will be 100% perfect all of the time, but I truly believe UAS is one of the best companies to work for!

– Clinical Supervisor, North Carolina


I have worked with UAS...

I have worked with UAS for 2 years and it has brought me joy to get multiple positive feedbacks from patients. I see them improve along the way of their treatment. They always feel so happy to see me “uncommon for people to react this way when they know they are receiving a shot”. I have had patients tell me they are so happy because now they can perform the things they love to do without feeling sick. Some will even mention they will follow me wherever I go. Even though I cannot take all my patients with me everywhere I go, it makes me feel good they have trust in me. I have seen it really works its wonders.

– CAS, Texas


I am fairly new...

I am a fairly new CAS to UAS. I started in December 2019. So far, the company has been more than welcoming. The POD that I am apart of is such a tight knit POD and someone is always there when I have a question. My CS is amazing! She has built up my confidence in being a new cAS and I can’t wait to see where this journey takes me! I am also a patient of UAS as well. The CAS that has been overseeing me has been so informative and it is wonderful to be able to relate to my patients on the same level as well. I can share with them my journey and use my experiences to help answer any questions they have and help was any doubts that they have. I am only one month in, but I can already tell that this will be a great tool to help my clinic grow as well!

– CAS, Maryland


My name is Ali...

My name is Ali and I work at the front desk of the clinic Jazmin works out of. Every single patient that comes in to see the allergy lab are always looking forward to see Jaz. Patients tend to be so interested in the allergy lab. Also, Jazmin always makes my day so much better.

– Provider, Texas


During my beginnings...

During my new beginnings and knowledge of this team’s services, I have witnessed phenomenal service not only to the patients but other staff as well. Whether it is walking into the office or walking out, I always see happy and satisfied patients. The services provided increase the flow of greater good to all. Thank you and all staff for sharing such compassion to make lives better.

– Provider, Texas


Immunotherapy is helping...

Immunotherapy is helping my patients improve chronic symptoms such as sinus congestion, frequent colds and URI, coughs, rashes, and headaches. In addition, it limits the overuse of prescribed antibiotics and patients are satisfied with the results.

– Provider, New Jersey


I have noticed...

I have noticed a lot of patients who suffer from allergies have gotten an allergy test and have accepted immunotherapy are extremely happy because they do not suffer with their allergies anymore.

– Provider, Maryland


spring allergy capital of america

Christmas Tree Syndrome

Christmas Tree Syndrome


November 30, 2017

One of the early signs the holidays are coming is the sight of Christmas trees popping up in homes around your neighborhood. For some, that means pulling an artificial tree out of a box; for others, it means heading to the nearby tree farm to pick up a real one. Whichever you prefer, there are important tips to keep in mind that can make the holidays a lot happier for the allergy sufferers in your life.

Let’s look at the pros and cons for each option, and see which yuletide centerpiece could be best for you and your family.

 

The Real Dealfir-2288229_1920

Some people will settle for nothing less than a real tree for the holidays, and it’s understandable why. You get to take the family to pick one out – or even cut one down yourself – and they have a wonderful scent that fills your home.

While it may be easy to blame your fresh Christmas tree for the allergy symptoms that arrive with it, conifers are seldom an important allergen. Mold is likely to blame. In a 2016 Connecticut study, researchers observed a dramatic increase in mold spore count in the two weeks after a Christmas tree was brought indoors:

“The study found that the mold spore count was 800 spores per square meter for the first three days. Normal spore counts are less than 1,000 spores per square meter. However, the spore count rose after day four, reaching a maximum of 5,000 spores per square meter by day 14.”

With those findings, it’s no surprise the article suggests avoidance may be the best measure for people with mold allergies:

“If one is mold-allergic, running an air cleaner in the same room as the tree could theoretically reduce the mold exposure, but this has not been studied… For some people who are sensitive to odors, the aroma from the tree, which most people like, could irritate their nose and cause symptoms. For these people, avoiding live trees may be best.”

What else can be done? For starters, reduce the amount of time that the tree is in your home by bringing the tree in just before Christmas and removing it the day after. The authors of a 2007 study suggested another simple solution: shaking as much debris as possible out of the tree before bringing it inside.

Elsewhere, those who have suffered from tree-related allergies have found some success in rinsing off the tree with a hose and sprayer, and then leaving the tree somewhere warm to dry for a couple of days before bringing it into the house. Using an air compressor to blow off debris might be an excellent alternative to avoid having to dry the tree out afterward.

And don’t forget: spray snow, like any aerosolized chemical, is an irritant that can cause reactions in your eyes, nose and lungs.

 

The Lookalikes

christmas-993304_1280There are others who favor having an artificial tree to display their Christmas cheer. They’re easy to assemble, and come in so many different shapes and sizes. On top of that, there aren’t any pesky dry pine needles on the floor to clean up. Most importantly, once the holidays are over, you can store it and use it year after year. With so many benefits, it’s easy to see why this is a popular choice.

The first year with a new artificial tree should be allergy-free. How you store the tree year after year will affect the allergens that it may bring into your home in the following years. Just like anything else you store in your garage or attic until its next use, it sits there and gathers dust. Lots of dust.

Dust and dust mites are among the most common triggers of allergic reactions, as well as the most common cause of asthma in children, according to the ACAAI. Can you imagine how much dust your tree has gathered since last year? That’s why, before adorning that artificial tree with tinsel and lights, a thorough clean is a must.

Another potential allergen that could be lurking in your stored artificial tree: cockroach. Cockroaches thrive in nice dark and warm places, such as the cardboard box you may be storing your tree in. Cardboard boxes are not only considered a nice place to live by cockroaches – they’re also a food source for them.

An air compressor can be used to blow off accumulated allergens before retrieving the tree from your closet or attic. If you opt to spray down your artificial tree with a hose, be sure to let it thoroughly dry outside the home before bringing it in to avoid mold. It is also recommended that you swap out the cardboard box that your tree came in for a storage bag that is moisture, dust, and pet resistant.

 

So, which option is better? Well, it depends on a person’s sensitivities. If you’re unsure if you suffer from mold, dust, or cockroach allergies, the easiest way to find out is to ask your doctor to perform an allergy skin test. It’s quick, and you’ll have your results before you walk out of the office.

Beyond that, keeping the air clear by replacing filters and opening the occasional window should also help, regardless of which tree you choose.

By understanding the pros and cons of each option, and by learning more about the allergies that could be affecting you or your loved ones, you can help ensure the only sniffles during this holiday season are of the merry, heartfelt kind.


Empowering Physicians to Fight Seasonal Allergies with Immunotherapy

Empowering Physicians to Fight Seasonal Allergies with Immunotherapy


June 1, 2015

“UAS is providing a way for primary care physicians to test and treat their patients with chronic allergic symptoms in a way that is safe and effective, while improving their quality of life.” Here, John Thresher of United Allergy Services sets the record straight.

See the full article


Allergy season not quite over yet

Sneezing, itchy nose and watery eyes — each a symptom of allergic rhinitis.

Coined “hay fever” after farmers would commonly experience these fever-type symptoms working out in the fields, seasonal allergies has symptoms country boy Craig Anderson has experienced all his life.

“We would play in the weeds until our eyes got so inflamed that we couldn’t even find our way home. It was kind of the question of the blind leading the blind, trying to find our way home," he said. "But we managed it.”

Johnnie Cook, M.D., said seasonal allergies are caused by pollens in the air: “What happens is that you breathe in that pollen and your body has a reaction because it thinks that’s a foreign thing.”

In the springtime, grass and tree pollens are high. Pollen from weeds trickle in as early as August and sticks around until the first hard frost," he explained. Symptoms include itchy nose, sneezing, itchy eyes and nasal congestion, and seasonal allergies can lead to irritability and trouble sleeping.

“There are studies where we see more allergies and more asthma now than we used to in the past.” Cook said although there are no official studies yet available, he suspects the reasoning may be attributed to more pollution and kids spending more time indoors than playing outside.

Cook added that allergies can come at any age, typically after you've been exposed for several years. Thirty to 40 percent of seasonal allergies can be treated with over-the-counter medications. The doctor urges reading labels closely and pay special attention to how long the medication lasts.

“Some studies show that Benadryl in a 25 mg. dose can be as impairing as alcohol at a legal limit,” Cook said. If symptoms persist, make an appointment with your doctor to explore the one of the many options for treatment. “There are some great solutions out there. (Allergy sufferers) should really seek a physician rather than be miserable and miss out on life. Life’s too precious.”

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By Jenniffer Michaelson, KSL
October 14, 2014
heraldtimesonline.com